Post Reply 
 
Thread Rating:
  • 8 Vote(s) - 2.25 Average
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Raw Meat: Fact From Fiction
08-19-2017, 06:11 PM
Post: #531
RE: Raw Meat: Fact From Fiction
http://www.msah.com/services/cats-dogs/b...food-diets

[Image: 36046561955_a3830a238d.jpg]
Owned by Eli the Maine Coon and Tiki the Ragdoll
User Tools
Quote this message in a reply
08-25-2017, 03:08 PM (This post was last modified: 08-25-2017 04:21 PM by tikismom.)
Post: #532
RE: Raw Meat: Fact From Fiction
No science on ‘no grain’

The Washington Post16 Aug 2017BY JENNA GALLEGOS jenna.gallegos@washpost.com

Sales of grain-free pet foods are spiking, but researchers say these are no healthier for dogs and cats.

The majority of pet cats and dogs in the United States are overweight or obese. As with our own dieting woes, the unpleasant prospect of the simple solution — feeding pets less — makes a lot of people reach for alternative, quick-fix strategies.

Many pet owners have turned to radically new menus. These grain-free, all-meat or raw-food diets are inspired by the meals eaten by wild relatives of pet Fidos and Felixes.

But are these diets really better for pets? Veterinarians and pet nutrition researchers say probably not.

According to clinical veterinary nutritionists at Tufts University, grain-free foods were one of the fastest-growing sectors of the pet food market in 2016. “All I ever hear is, oh, on a good diet, it’s grain-free,” said Dena Lock, a veterinarian in Texas. The majority of her pet patients are overweight.

Why have these pet diets become so popular?

“It’s a marketing trend,” Lock said.

“Grain-free is marketing. It’s only marketing,” said Cailin R. Heinze, a small-animal nutritionist at Tufts’ Cummings School of Veterinary Medicine. “A lot of foods market themselves by what they’re not including,” and the implication is that the excluded ingredient must be bad.

“Grain-free is definitely a marketing technique that has been very successful,” said Jennifer A. Larsen, a clinical nutritionist at the University of California at Davis School of Veterinary Medicine. People think that if they pay a lot for food and there are a lot of exclusions on the bag, the food is healthier, but “they’re buying an idea,” she said, “not necessarily a superior product.”

There is absolutely no data to support the idea that grain-free diets are better for pets, Heinze and Larsen noted.

Some pet owners have a false impression that grains are more likely to cause an allergic reaction, but “it’s much more common for dogs to have allergies to meat than to grain,” Heinz said. Chicken, beef, eggs, dairy and wheat are the most common allergies in dogs. And it’s not that there is anything particularly allergenic about these foods, she said — they are just the most frequently used ingredients.

Marketing campaigns such as Blue Buffalo’s “Wilderness” or Chewy’s “Taste of the Wild” claim that their grain-free, meat forward formulations better reflect the ancestral diets of dogs’ and cats’ evolutionary predecessors, but veterinarians question this logic.

For one, pets’ wild cousins are not all that healthy. “People believe that nature is best,” Larsen said, but “animals in the wild don’t live that long, and they don’t lead very healthy lives.”

Dogs have diverged from ancestral wolves genetically in their ability to digest starches. “Dogs aren’t wolves,” said Robert Wayne, a canine geneticist at the University of California at Los Angeles. “They have adapted to a human diet.”

Research in Wayne’s lab showed that most wolves carry two copies of a gene involved in starch digestion, while dogs have between three and 29 copies. According to Tufts’ Heinze, the average dog can easily handle 50 percent of its diet as carbs.

For cats, the argument against carbohydrate consumption makes a little more sense. Cats are carnivores rather than omnivores, so they have higher protein requirements than dogs. But “cats can digest and utilize carbohydrates quite well,” said Andrea Fascetti, a veterinary nutritionist at the UC Davis veterinary school.

Dogs and cats also have a drastically different lifestyle from wolves or tigers. Pets are almost always spayed and neutered, which is a risk factor for obesity. And most live inside or in pens, so their energy needs are reduced dramatically.

In the wild, wolves and feline predators eat the hair, bones and cartilage of their prey, not just meat. For pet owners who choose to feed their animals an all-meat diet, it is essential to add supplements to make sure their pet is not missing out on key nutrients such as calcium, Fascetti said. And there is the environmental impact to consider: Pets consume a quarter of all animal derived calories in the United States.

Experts especially caution against feeding pets raw meat. “It’s not uncommon to find things like salmonella and E. coli and listeria in raw meat,” Larsen said. There are a lot of microbes present in our farming systems, and unlike when an animal is hunting in the wild, there are many opportunities for bacteria to contaminate meat between the time an animal is slaughtered and when it reaches our kitchens.

Even if eating contaminated meat does not make pets sick, it poses a health risk to pet owners and their children who handle the animal’s food and waste. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the Food and Drug Administration both warn against feeding raw meat to your pets.

If pet owners are feeding a pet a balanced diet such as in a commercial chow, obesity is the biggest nutrition issue they should worry about, Heinze said.

People want their pets to enjoy what they’re eating, so many foods and especially treats are formulated to be high in fat, Larsen said. A milk bone has about as many calories as a candy bar, Lock said.

But studies have found that feeding dogs to maintain a lean body weight has positive effects on their overall health and can even increase life span. “We believe that these findings apply to cats, as well,” Fascetti said.

When it comes to navigating marketing claims in the pet food aisle, Lock suggests finding a company that employs a veterinary nutritionist and does feeding trials. Try not to get too hung up on “the no list,” Heinze said. “Claims like no gluten, no grains and no soy generally mean no science.”

“Claims like no gluten, no grains and no soy generally mean no science.” Cailin R. Heinze, Tufts University’s Cummings School of Veterinary Medicine
"https://www.pressreader.com/usa/the-washington-post/20170816/281535111098593"


http://vetnutrition.tufts.edu/2016/01/ra...-raw-deal/

https://www.cdc.gov/features/raw-pet-food/index.html

http://www.mountainroadvet.com/need-know...ial-diets/

[Image: 36046561955_a3830a238d.jpg]
Owned by Eli the Maine Coon and Tiki the Ragdoll
User Tools
Quote this message in a reply
08-27-2017, 09:30 AM
Post: #533
RE: Raw Meat: Fact From Fiction
"The dangers of raw diets

Some sources strongly recommend raw diets for pets with cancer but these diets could be very dangerous to your pet! It is very important to avoid feeding raw diets or treats to pets with cancer! Raw meat, eggs, and milk carry high risk of bacterial contamination with Salmonella, Listeria, E. coli, Campylobacter, and other potentially dangerous bacteria. Freezing or freeze-drying do not make raw diets safe. While these bacteria can infect healthy pets (and people in the household), pets with cancer may be at greater risk due to alterations in their immune systems. Pets undergoing common types of chemotherapy are particularly at risk as many drugs used for chemotherapy reduce the white blood cells, sometimes dramatically, that are used to fight infections. Concerns over bacterial contamination of food during cancer treatment is not a uniquely pet issue – food-borne infection is also a serious concern in people undergoing cancer treatment."
http://vetnutrition.tufts.edu/2017/08/cancer_diet/

[Image: 36046561955_a3830a238d.jpg]
Owned by Eli the Maine Coon and Tiki the Ragdoll
User Tools
Quote this message in a reply
08-29-2017, 04:49 PM
Post: #534
RE: Raw Meat: Fact From Fiction
http://www.nj.com/pets/index.ssf/2017/08..._deal.html

[Image: 36046561955_a3830a238d.jpg]
Owned by Eli the Maine Coon and Tiki the Ragdoll
User Tools
Quote this message in a reply
09-11-2017, 05:49 PM
Post: #535
RE: Raw Meat: Fact From Fiction
"Different diets seem to be all the rage today. All you have to do is google “different diets” and BAM! You are overwhelmed with different articles about the Atkins diet, vegan diets, paleo diets, weight watchers and so on. Our pets are no exception when it comes to this craze. Walk into a pet store and the choices of pet food is overwhelming! Not to mention things like homemade diets! Today I want to discuss one diet in particular that has gained traction in the dog community. The raw diet.

For those who don’t know what a raw diet is, it involves feeding raw meat (often still on the bone), bones and organs. Often owners will rave about the perceived benefits of this diet but are not aware (or choose to ignore) the serious health risks for both them and their animal. There is a lot of misinformation to be found on the internet which I will try to clear up (no big deal, just taking on the entire internet here).

The most serious concern with raw diets is the human health risk. Anywhere from 20-80% of raw diets are contaminated with Salmonella, E. coli or Listeria, all of which are a serious health concern not only for pets but owners as well. In dogs, Salmonella can lead to diarrhea, vomiting and a fever, progressing to the point of severe dehydration if not treated appropriately. Of equal concern is the human health risk. In particular young children, seniors or immunocompromised people are at greater risk. Listeria can lead to miscarriages and stillbirths in pregnant women as well.

Bacterial contamination isn’t the only threat to your pets’ health when feeding raw diets. Raw diets are nutritionally unbalanced and don’t provide essential nutrients. As dogs age, these deficiencies will make your dog more prone to various diseases. For example, many raw diets are deficient in calcium which weakens bones and makes your pet more prone to fractures. Growing pets, in particular, need a properly balanced diet, something which raw diets cannot supply. Studies have look at various commercial and homemade raw diets and nearly all of them had major nutritional imbalances.

There are other health risks that a raw diet poses to your pet as well. Often these diets will contain bones in an effort to increase calcium levels. These bones can splinter and potentially perforate the esophagus, stomach or intestines of a dog causing serious life-threatening consequences. Even ground up bones can cause an impaction leading to potential surgery.

To sum everything up, there have been no scientific studies showing the benefit of feeding a raw diet. The risks to both human and animal health far outweigh any potential benefit that may be there. Instead of feeding raw, a high-quality diet made by a reputable pet food company is a much healthier and safer choice for both you and your loved one."
http://www.parkroadvet.com/know-raw-diets/

[Image: 36046561955_a3830a238d.jpg]
Owned by Eli the Maine Coon and Tiki the Ragdoll
User Tools
Quote this message in a reply
09-12-2017, 06:16 PM
Post: #536
RE: Raw Meat: Fact From Fiction
http://www.nj.com/pets/index.ssf/2017/08..._deal.html

[Image: 36046561955_a3830a238d.jpg]
Owned by Eli the Maine Coon and Tiki the Ragdoll
User Tools
Quote this message in a reply
09-25-2017, 08:16 AM
Post: #537
RE: Raw Meat: Fact From Fiction
" 20-35 percent of raw poultry carcasses test positive for Salmonella
80 percent of raw food diets for dogs test positive for Salmonella
30 percent of stool samples from dogs fed these diets test positive for Salmonella
Salmonella outbreaks have been reported in dogs fed raw meat
Gastroenteritis (vomiting/diarrhea/dehydration) has occurred in pets fed raw meat
Enterotoxins, which are protein toxins released by a microorganism in the intestine, can cause multiple organ failure
Dogs can be carriers of salmonella without showing any symptoms

There are also physical risks to your pet such as the potential for raw bones to fracture teeth and perforate or obstruct the gastrointestinal tract. Nutrient imbalances in the calcium-phosphorous ratio3 in the diet are a significant concern in growing kittens and puppies. Raw diets tend to provide excessive amounts of vitamin A and D3,4 along with mineral imbalances, and this can lead to secondary nutritionally based diseases."
https://www.banfield.com/pet-healthcare/...=20170831b

[Image: 36046561955_a3830a238d.jpg]
Owned by Eli the Maine Coon and Tiki the Ragdoll
User Tools
Quote this message in a reply
10-14-2017, 12:10 AM
Post: #538
RE: Raw Meat: Fact From Fiction
"Risks of Feeding Raw Diets to Dogs
The feeding of raw diets has become increasingly popular in dogs over recent years, however, there are some points to consider, in addition to the lack of scientific evidence to back up their benefits, before opting to feed this diet option to your dog.
Most veterinary organisations do not support the feeding of raw diets due to the risks that feeding them can entail. The following points detail the risks and inconveniences of feeding raw diets to dogs:
Feeding a raw diet brings with it the risk of a dog suffering from nutritional imbalances and deficiencies, including excesses of vitamin D, vitamin A, an imbalance of calcium to phosphorus and a lack of calcium, phosphorus, zinc, magnesium and potassium.
It is common for raw diets to contain micro organisms that can cause illness and bacteria, such as Salmonella and E. coli, which are responsible for food poisoning. If there are young children or members of the family who are immunocompromised in a household, then this is an important point to consider. These organisms can infect humans, either when handling the food, or if they are shed in dog’s faeces.
Sharp bones or bones which become splintered after the dog has chewed them can rupture the intestine or become stuck and block the intestine. Both of these situations are life threatening and require surgery.
There is a high risk of dental fractures when feeding bones.
Not all dogs are able to tolerate a raw diet, particularly if they are older, have poor dentition or suffer from any diseases which affect their ability to digest certain nutrients.
Raw diets can cause hyperthyroidism.
If a dog is prone to food guarding feeding a raw diet, particularly bones can exacerbate the problem and increase the level of social aggression which the dog shows.
Last but not least, raw diets can be messy, which is definitely something to consider if a dog lives in a small flat or is fed inside."
http://www.dogzone.com/articles/nutritio...-for-dogs/

[Image: 36046561955_a3830a238d.jpg]
Owned by Eli the Maine Coon and Tiki the Ragdoll
User Tools
Quote this message in a reply
10-18-2017, 03:29 PM
Post: #539
RE: Raw Meat: Fact From Fiction
"Understanding the Raw Food Diet — And Why It’s Frequently a Raw Deal

Though nature might dictate a raw diet for a lion who needs to stay sleek and sure while racing the Serengeti in search of prey, it’s not a fit for your dumpling of a cat, curled up luxuriously in his (your) favorite armchair. Yes, your cat still possesses the basic GI tract of the big cats on his ancestral tree, but he doesn’t have to live with raw food’s very real risk of bacterial contamination. This is an especially grave risk for compromised cats, such as those that are immunosuppressed, pregnant, frail due to advancing age, and so on. Even healthy cats can get seriously sick from harmful bacteria in raw food.

“Raw meat is contaminated until proven otherwise: This is the best way to look at it,” says Dr. Heinze. According to surveys conducted by Consumer Reports and other organizations, potentially harmful bacteria are present in most meats purchased in grocery stores, and the only way to limit the risk of illness is to cook the meat. And that is what you do for yourself to stay safe, so it stands to reason that you would do the same for your cat.

But the whole point of a raw-food diet is that it is not cooked, meaning the risk remains. Most commercial raw diets are purchased either frozen or freeze-dried, but neither of these processes reliably kills bacteria. Newer methods — such as high pressure pasteurization (HPP) — are also being used for commercial raw diets, but it is still unclear whether this processing is equivalent to cooking in terms of reducing bacterial loads. There’s some evidence that HPP may not eliminate bacterial contamination, as a number of these products have been recalled due to testing positive for bacteria that can make people and pets sick. The only methods that have been proven to thoroughly destroy bacteria thus far are irradiation and cooking to a proper temperature for that type of meat.

Bacterial contamination aside, ensuring that your cat is also getting enough of all essential nutrients can also potentially be a problem. “I’ve definitely seen some commercial raw products that had labeling violations (meaning the label didn’t meet current regulations) and nutrient levels that didn’t meet current nutritional guidelines or otherwise didn’t make sense with other information provided on the food. Some raw diets do not use concentrated supplements and rely only on whole foods to meet nutrient requirements and this can increase the risk of deficiencies of nutrients that may be in lower levels in the main ingredients,” explains Dr. Heinze.

Many pet owners say that what attracts them to raw-food diets is how great they make their cat look with its glossy coat and small stools, but that gloss is typically due to the high fat content and the small stools due to high digestibility — both properties of which can be duplicated in a properly cooked diet as well, says Dr. Heinze. What should perhaps instead catch the consumer’s eye is raw food’s reported potential for gastrointestinal disease, blood infections, and even death from pathogenic bacteria, explains Dr. Heinze.

In an article by Tufts Veterinary Nutritionist Lisa Freeman, DVM, PhD, DACVN and colleagues in the Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association, a number of studies are cited pointing to harmful bacterial contamination of raw food diets fed to pets. Some of the studies found contamination of salmonella of up to 48 percent in commercial raw meat-based diets, and eight out of 10 exclusively home-based raw diets had salmonella. This shouldn’t be too surprising because it is estimated that up to 44 percent of chicken bought at various retailers in North America are found to be contaminated with the harmful bacteria.

Bacteria that have been identified in raw meat-based diets include E. coli, Clostridium, Campylobacter jejun, Toxoplasma gondii and Echinococcus multilocularis. Adding to the concern is that harmful bacteria in a pet’s food can pose a risk to the humans who prepare the pet’s meals, particularly if their health is

compromised in any way. And though some raw meat-based diet manufacturers are now using high-pressure pasteurization to reduce pathogens in commercial food, it does not completely eliminate them.

A study by the FDA Center for Veterinary Medicine (CVM) ending in July of 2012, which found that of 196 raw pet food samples, 32 were positive for L. monocytogenes and 15 were positive for Salmonella, prompted a warning. The CVM warned that this contamination was more common in raw food than in regular commercial pet food, and that it not only posed a health hazard to pets but also to the people who served the food if they did not wash their hands properly after handling it.

These health risks are particularly serious for the elderly, infants, pregnant women and their fetuses, and individuals with compromised immune systems. Infections can even be passed on in everyday interactions between you and your cat. Because of the real risks, the CVM states, “To prevent infecting yourself or other people in your household with Salmonella and L. monocytogenes, it’s best if you don’t feed your pet a raw diet.”"
http://news.vet.tufts.edu/2017/10/feedin...made-diet/

[Image: 36046561955_a3830a238d.jpg]
Owned by Eli the Maine Coon and Tiki the Ragdoll
User Tools
Quote this message in a reply
11-16-2017, 09:48 AM
Post: #540
RE: Raw Meat: Fact From Fiction
"Antimicrobial resistance poses a worldwide threat to human and animal health.
Close contact between pets and owners provides the opportunity for transmission of antimicrobial resistant organisms like extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL)/AmpC beta-lactamase (AmpC)-producing Enterobacteriaceae, posing a risk to public health.
Raw pet food products are shown to be an important risk factor for ESBL/AmpC shedding in household cats. Consistent exposure to raw pet food products seems to be accompanied by ESBL-pE shedding, opposed to gut colonization. Pet owners should be aware of a possible risk for ESBL uptake when handling raw pet food products."
http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article...ne.0187239

[Image: 36046561955_a3830a238d.jpg]
Owned by Eli the Maine Coon and Tiki the Ragdoll
User Tools
Quote this message in a reply
Post Reply 


Forum Jump:


User(s) browsing this thread:
2 Guest(s)

Top Pet Websites